Lowndes Attorneys Obtain Favorable Rulings for Court-Appointed Receiver

Orlando, FL–Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster, Kantor & Reed, P.A. is pleased to announce that shareholder, Richard Dellinger, and appellate attorney, Jennifer R. Dixon, prevailed in defending a client appointed to serve as a receiver in proceedings brought by the Securities & Exchange Commission (the “SEC”).  The SEC action involved allegations of fraud and violations of the Securities Exchange Act by a public company.  In an unpublished opinion, in Securities & Exchange Commission vs. North American Clearing, Inc., the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida, which twice denied the accused’s requests to sue the receiver and the court-appointed trustee, pursuant to Barton v. Barbour, 104 U.S. 126 (1881), for acts undertaken during the SEC proceeding.  The district court found, and the appellate court affirmed, that the alleged acts of the receiver were within the scope of the receiver’s authority, shielding the receiver from liability. Attorney Dellinger represented the receiver in proceedings before the district court.  Attorney Dixon defended the appeal.

Noteworthy in the unpublished opinion was the Court’s determination of the standard of review for a challenge to the denial of a Barton motion—a matter of first impression in the Eleventh Circuit. Citing the Second, Third, Sixth, Seventh and Ninth Circuit Courts of Appeal, the court determined that the standard of review for such motions is abuse of discretion.

Founded in Orlando, Florida in 1969, Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster, Kantor & Reed, P.A. is a multi-practice business law firm. Our attorneys represent corporate, entrepreneurial and individual clients across a myriad of industries locally, nationally and beyond our borders, from offices in Orlando, Mount Dora and Melbourne, and through Meritas, an established global alliance of independent law firms offering local insight, local rates and world-class client service. LOCAL ROOTS. BROAD REACH.SM www.lowndes-law.com


Florida’s Highest Court Refuses Webster’s Request for “Seat at the Table”

Fla RedisToday, the Supreme Court of Florida entered an order denying U.S. Senator, Daniel Webster’s request to intervene in the widely-reported Florida redistricting case, League of Women Voters of Florida, Inc., et al. v. Detzer, Case No.  SC14-1905. Webster filed a Motion to Intervene on October 22, 2015, recognizing that “generally intervention is not authorized at the appellate level,” but arguing that “this is an extraordinary case.”

The primary reason given for Webster’s motion to intervene:  “The Congressional District of a sitting United States Congressman is being transmuted into a majority minority district in which he stands no chance of re-election, and he has, to date, not been permitted ‘a seat at the table.'”  Effectively Webster argued that “the Proposed Remedial Plans for District 10 are unconstitutional because they fail to comply with Art. III, § 20’s tier-one requirements for having been drawn with the intent to disfavor a political party or incumbent . . . [and] do not adhere to Art. III, § 20’s tier-two requirements of compactness and utilization of political and geographic boundaries.”  According to Webster’s motion, the plans for District 10 would split Orlando into two districts–a practice that is disfavored under Florida’s Constitution.

The Court denied the Motion to Intervene without opinion.  In light of the “long shot” possibility of appellate intervention in Florida’s state courts, it is possible that Webster simply wanted to plant a seed with the court, as it seems none of the true parties to the case have raised any issue with the Proposed Remedial Plans for District 10.  We will have to stay tuned to learn whether the tactic was effective.

Economic Development in the Sunshine?

The Fifth District Court of Appeal heard oral argument today on the issue of whether the records of the Economic Development Commission of Brevard County are subject to public inspection.  The lower court ruled that such records are subject to public inspection.  The EDC has appealed, arguing that its records should be exempt from the public records law.  Read more about today’s oral arguments HERE.  Check back for further developments on this case.

New Rules Bring New Requirements in the Fifth DCA

If you are a registered filer with e-DCA, you may have received this notice from the Fifth DCA last week.  Because of changes to the Florida Rules of Appellate Procedure, attorneys are now required to notify the appellate court when there is a pending motion in the trial court that delays rendition of a final order.  In the civil/family law contexts, such motions would include motions for new trial, for rehearing, for certification, to alter or amend the final judgment, for judgment in accordance with prior motion for directed verdict, for arrest of judgment, to challenge the verdict, or to vacate an order based upon recommendation of a hearing officer pursuant to Fla. Family Law Rule of Procedure 12.491.

Previously, the filing of a notice of appeal while a post-trial motion was pending resulted in abandonment of the motion.  On January 1, 2015, Rule 9.020(j) was amended such that, if a notice of appeal is timely filed before adjudication of a post-trial motion, the appeal is held in abeyance until the trial court has ruled on the motion.  To facilitate the administration of the new rule, the Fifth DCA has adopted the requirement that attorneys must notify the appellate court when such a motion is pending in the trial court, and when an order disposing of the motion has been entered.

At this point, only the 5th DCA has adopted this formal requirement, but other courts will likely follow suit.  In any event, it’s good practice to ensure the appeal is abated. 

Late-Filed Civil Appeals a Nonstarter

What should a civil litigant do when he or she is made aware of the entry of a final judgment after the expiration of the appeal period?  The First District Court of Appeal reminds us in an opinion issued in Sharpe v. Stanley, Case No. 1D14-1190, 39 Fla. L. Weekly D928a (Fla. 1st DCA May 1, 2014) that the appellate court has no authority to grant relief from an untimely-filed appeal in a civil proceeding.  That does not mean, however, that all appellate avenues are foreclosed.  As the court reminds us, relief “may be sought in the trial court by motion under Fla. R. Civ. P. 1.540(b) to set aside the order where no notice of its entry was given to the parties, coupled with a requst that a new order be entered so that the right of appeal is preserved.” 

What Does an Appellate Lawyer Do?

Most people understand the primary function of an appellate attorney:  to research and write appellate briefs and present oral arguments to the appellate panel.  However, many people, including lawyers, are not aware of the many other ways an appellate attorney can “add value” to a litigation team.  An appellate attorney can be an invaluable trial team member from the outset of a case.  An experienced appellate practitioner often has significant litigation experience at the trial level, and is well equipped to assist in sophisticated legal analysis, strategy, and issue identification.  Appellate attorneys are also proficient writers and can assist in drafting bench briefs for the trial court.  

Because trials can be hectic and unpredictible, trial lawyers are primarily focused on presenting their case themes for the judge or jury.  In a complex trial, it is advisable to have an dedicated appellate practitioner on the trial team observing the proceedings objectively, and ensuring that all potential points of error have been properly preserved in the event an appeal is taken.  Additionally, having an appellate attorney involved from the commencement of the trial can signficantly reduce the costs of preparing an appeal. 

If you need assistance in any of the following areas, please contact jennifer.dixon@lowndes-law.com or (407) 843-4600:

  • Commercial litigation appeals
  • Family law appeals
  • Eminent domain/condemnation appeals
  • Administrative appeals
  • Original proceedings
  • Amicus briefs
  • Trial support
  • Appellate mediation